Notation (Advanced)


Introduction

Like chess, Crumble has its own notation system. But because Crumble gets, well, crumbly, the notation system is necessarily complex. You do not need to know how to notate Crumble in order to play. This is a completely optional part of the game, and if you're still struggling with the rules, you should probably skip it for now.

Finding Your Piece

To make a move in Crumble, you first must identify the piece you want to start with, either to split or join. To do this, we traverse the bordering lines between pieces, counting the intersections crossing or meeting these lines until we reach the lower left corner of the piece we want.

Here is the standard formula for identifying any piece on the playing field:

  1. Start at the lower left corner of the lower left piece on the playing field.
  2. Travel East along the bottom edge of the pieces, counting each intersection along the way. The initial lower left corner counts as 0.
  3. When you've gone as far East as you wish, travel North along the vertical edge of the pieces, counting each intersection along the way. Again, the starting intersection counts as 0.
  4. Alternate between East and North this way, until you reach the lower left corner of the target piece. The list of intersection-counts is the notation for identifying that piece.

Here are some simple examples. Remember we are counting along the edges of pieces, not the pieces themselves. If the edge we are following comes to an end against the side of a piece, we have no choice but to change direction again.

Location:
0

 
Location:
3

Location:
0,3

 
Location:
2,2


And some more complex examples:

Location:
3,1,1
In this case, starting from the lower left corner of the lower left piece, we count 3 intersections to the East. From there we count 1 intersection North, and 1 more to the East. That brings us to the lower left corner of the target piece.



Location:
3,3,1,1
Starting from the lower left corner of the lower left piece, count 3 intersections to the East. Change direction at that point and count 3 intersections North. Then 1 more East, and 1 more North, to arrive at the target piece.


Joining

Joining first identifies the lower left corner of the starting piece, and then, using that as the new 0 point, identifies the upper right corner of the target join.

Join Pieces

The examples in this section all start from the same position:


There are many joins that black could make from that position. Here are several of them:

Full move notation:
4,1,2J3,5



Full move notation:
4,3J5,4

Full move notation:
4,1J5,4



Full move notation:
4,1,1J4,3

Full move notation:
4,4J2,2



Full move notation:
4,3,1J3,3


Join Pieces And Swap

To do a swap after joining, just do the notation to specify the join, and then tack on the direction of the swap.


Before white's move
 

Move colorized for clarity
 

White joined two squares into a rectangle, and swapped West.

Full move notation:
2,1J1,2W


Splitting


Split One Piece With A Vertical Split-Line



Before black's move
 

Move colorized for clarity
 

Black has split a square with a vertical split-line, and swapped East.

Full move notation:
3,2VE


Split One Piece With A Horizontal Split-Line



Before white's move



Move colorized for clarity



White has split a square with a horizontal split-line, and swapped South.

Full move notation:
2,2HS


Split One Piece And Swap In The Direction Of The Split-Line

When swapping in the same direction as the split-line, both of the new pieces can theoretically swap in that direction, so you need to specify which of the new pieces is going to swap. In some cases this will be obvious, but the notation states the piece explicitly.



Before black's move



Move colorized for clarity



Black has split a rectangle with a horizontal split-line, and swapped the northern one West.

Full move notation:
3,2HN-W


Split Multiple Pieces

To split multiple pieces, you notate it the same as splitting just a single piece, but then specify the number of pieces to split. Horizontal split-lines always extend East, and vertical split-lines always extend West.


Before white's move



Move colorized for clarity



White has split three pieces with a horizontal split-line extended East. 

Full move notation:
1,1H3


To split multiple pieces that don't neighbor each other, just specify the number of pieces to split:


Before white's move



Move colorized for clarity



White has split two pieces with a vertical split-line extended North. 

Full move notation:
3,1V2


Split Multiple Pieces And Swap

Having split multiple pieces, only one of the newly split pieces may swap. This is identified first by clarifying which of the starting pieces, and then which half of that piece, is to be swapped. Here are several examples:


Before white's move



Move colorized for clarity



White has split two pieces with a vertical split-line extending North. The eastern portion of the first split piece is swapped East, North, and East.

Full move notation:
3,1V2-1E-ENE



Before white's move



Move colorized for clarity



White has split two pieces with a vertical split-line extending North. The western portion of the first split piece is swapped North, West, and North.

Full move notation:
3,1V2-1W-NWN



Before white's move



Move colorized for clarity



White has split two pieces with a vertical split-line extending North. The eastern portion of the second split piece is swapped East, South, and East.

Full move notation:
3,1V2-2E-ESE



Before white's move



Move colorized for clarity



White has split two pieces with a vertical split-line extending North. The western portion of the second split piece is swapped West, South, South, and East.

Full move notation:
3,1V2-2W-WSSE









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